Latest posts from the ‘SEO’ Category

Reprise Media’s Inbound Marketing Team Expands With 5 Hires

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Craig Ellis - Josh Barnard - Alex Rahr - Colm Flanagan - Daniel Hornung

Specialist digital agency Reprise is expanding its inbound marketing capabilities as clients continue to invest in enhancing their customers’ digital experience.

Inbound marketing is a holistic, data driven two-way approach to marketing that focuses on attracting individuals to your brand, engaging them with relevant content, converting them into long lasting customers and brand ambassadors.

There are five executives in new roles for Reprise.

Daniel Hornung has joined the inbound marketing team from the former Bruce Clay, where he was SEO account manager working on clients including Domino’s, Hyatt Hotels, Lonely Planet and Suncorp Bank.

Josh Barnard has joined Reprise from sister IPG Mediabrands business Mnet where he worked for four years, most recently as technical operations manager.

Alex Rahr has joined from Wunderman where he worked on planning and strategy.

Rafael Canto joins Reprise in November after two and a half years working as an inbound marketing strategist for SDL Netherlands.

Colm Flanagan has been promoted to inbound marketing manager, having been SEO specialist since joining the agency in February 2013.

“We’ve been extremely successful with our inbound marketing approach since our IAB Search Marketing Award for organic search in 2013,” said Reprise Australia CEO Craig Ellis. “These new hires signal a significant step-change in our approach to digital marketing, underpinned by strong inbound expertise. Inbound marketing strategies are constantly strong performers for our clients and we will continue to resource our business with the top talent we’re attracting from around the globe.

“It’s a no-brainer. Clients are understanding more and more the importance of a high-performing, highly-tuned website enriched with relevant, engaging content to their bottom line and are diverting budgets accordingly”.


Why Sitelink Search Box changes may be affecting your search traffic

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

Your website may be losing valuable clicks to competitors due to recent search results page changes involving enhanced Sitelink Search Boxes in organic search results pages. The below pointers highlight some quick changes that can get your website back on track and reduce any potential brand traffic losses.

What is the Sitelink Search Box?

Recently, an interesting change to the SERP’s has been introduced by Google, allowing searchers to ‘search within a site’ using the Sitelinks Search Box. This allows you to quickly filter content found on authoritative domains and is normally restricted to brand searches. You can check if this appears for your website by searching for your main brand term in Google.

Whilst this is a clever and quite useful search results update, the downside is that Google ads appear next to the filtered search results, allowing competitors to attract the click of that user. An example of the search box can be seen below:

Sitelink search box example for Bunnings

The secondary page shown, for example “power tools” gives a Google search results page with the related tools pages, but also has competitor ads which could be clicked, taking away a potential customer:

Sitelink search box results page

As such, it would be recommended that all webmasters who have an enhanced Sitelink Search Box for their websites implement a simple code change to ensure searchers are navigated directly to use your search pages.

This can be achieved by following the Sitelink Search Box coding recommendations found on the Google developer hub: https://developers.google.com/webmasters/richsnippets/sitelinkssearch. This ensures that searchers are pushed through to an internal page on your website, rather than an ad heavy Google search page. This also helps the user experience and prevents any visitor drop off before they arrive on your page.

A good example of this implementation is Amazon’s UK website, which direct users direct to the Amazon search pages when this search box is used.

On site search redirection *Bonus Tip*

A secondary recommendation, which can be considered during these suggestions is to look at how users are directed on a website following popular searches. An example brand utilising this well is fashion retailer The ICONIC.

When searching for “Nike” for example, the user is automatically redirected to the Nike brand page rather than a more generic search results page, giving a richer user experience. By doing so, it is possible for e-commerce stores to create a more seamless web experience for their visitors. In the below example, customised copy and imagery are used to add value to the Nike product range.

Nike directional search example

For step-by-step information on how this could be implemented for your website or you require any more information on the above, please drop us a line and we would be happy to help.


The SEO Guide to WordPress Plugins

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

WordPress Plugins

These days it seems there’s a WordPress plugin for just about everything. They range in purpose from changing the way a site looks to how it performs in search or in a browser.

Given the sheer size and popularity of WordPress there is certainly no shortage of plugins to choose from. And with WordPress 4.0 “Benny” released not too long ago, every man and his dog has been scrambling to get their plugins up to date.

Ask anyone who’s ever made a WordPress website and without even thinking they’ll tell you to install WordPress SEO by Yoast and W3 Total Cache. Both of these plugins just happen to be in the Top WordPress plugins on WPThemeDetector.com.

WordPress SEO by Yoast

WordPress SEO is the most popular plugin for WordPress, period. I’ve never made a WordPress site without it,  even before I started in SEO. Now that I know more about how search engines work and how to optimise websites, I use it even more. The only difference being now I know what half of the features do.

WordPress SEO caters for all user levels, from beginner to advanced. Don’t know what you’re doing? That’s fine, just let the plugin do everything for you. Think you know better? Do it your way, that’s cool. Flexible, highly configurable and well-supported. You’ll see the Yoast team active on Twitter daily and they’re always there to help. They believe in their product and want you to have success with your site.

W3 Total Cache

Another popular plugin that comes highly recommended from major web hosts such as Dreamhost and GoDaddy, even by the likes of Matt Cutts. W3 Total Cache is the ultimate tool for optimizing the performance of your WordPress site. And guess what, it’s even recommended by Yoast!

If you’ve ever run a page speed test (and let’s face it, you probably have) then you will be familiar with performance improvement suggestions such as minifying CSS/JS or adding expire headers. W3 Total Cache is the perfect plugin for doing just that. I’m yet to unleash the full potential of this plugin. I use it mostly for caching and minifying but there are many more features to explore. There’s also a lot of support for this plugin in case you get stuck.

Which WordPress plugins do you prefer?

I asked around at work and online to see what people’s favourite plugins are. Here’s a quick look at what people are talking about.

Justin – SEO Specialist at Reprise

“A couple of my favs and essentials for any WordPress installation are Autoptimize, which optimizes page speed by concatenating CSS & JavaScript and compressing them, and GZip Ninja Speed Compression to compress your site with Gzip.”

@WPThemeDetector

“My #1 is one that is not in the Top Plugin reports because it doesn’t show up on the site html code: BackupBuddy. I like BackupBuddy not only for the relief feeling backups give you, it’s also a great plugin for deploying WP sites from dev to live.”

Alex – SEO Executive at Reprise

Akismet came bundled into my first WordPress install and I’ve never had a spam blog comment on any of my blogs.”

@ReferralCandy

“Hmm! I like @yoast’s all-in-one SEO plugin. I’m not sure how much time it’s saving us, but it’s so easy and convenient! Another good, simple plugin is WordPress Editorial Calendar… great for scheduling drafts, etc.”

Daniel – SEO Specialist at Reprise

“I always use HeadSpace2 SEO as this plugin can take care of my SEO from site wide meta to 404 pages, plus it can add tracking for a host of tools, from GA to Crazy Egg and much more.”


Why Google Webmaster Tools Academy is essential learning!

Friday, August 15th, 2014

webmaster academy logo

Compared to Google’s Analytics Academy and exam, completing the Webmaster Academy course is a walk in the park. Whilst there’s no official certification test at the end of the course, it’s still a really valuable experience for anyone just starting out in building websites or learning SEO. You will learn some ways to use Webmaster Tools for SEO, but more importantly you will also learn the best practices for building and marketing your websites.

What is Google Webmaster Tools?

Google Webmaster Tools is a reporting tool provided by Google to help you monitor how your website performs. But isn’t that what Google Analytics is for? Google Analytics is great, but it only gives you information about users who have actually used your website. It doesn’t tell you much about what’s happening with your SEO. Webmaster Tools is on the opposite side of the fence. With it’s collection of different reports you can see how your website performs on the world’s largest website – Google Search. You can get some of the same reports across both Webmaster Tools and Analytics but the key difference is where the information is actually measured. Information for Google Analytics is measured on your website, whilst information for Webmaster tools is measured before the user even reaches your website – on Google’s search engine.

How does Webmaster Tools collect information?

Google uses a smart little robot to do all the hard work. This is the name of the computer code that tries it’s best to discover all of the internet’s websites so that they can be displayed in Google’s search results. Also known as a Spider, this program works by “spidering” links into a web of information. It follows both internal links across your website and external links between websites.

the internship movie looking at each other as google webmaster tools academy graduates

Why you should do the Webmaster Academy!

More people using the internet means more business for Google’s ad network. Because of this Google wants their users to use the internet as much as possible and to have the best search and internet experience possible! Google has put a lot of thought into making the Webmaster Academy a valuable resource for new webmasters with three modules that cover:

  1. How to setup your site, identify your audience and create content.
  2. How Google understands your site and how to optimize.
  3. How to use webmaster tools to keep your site healthy.

From doing the academy and playing around with the Webmaster Tools you will be able understand:

  • Which of your website’s pages are indexed by Google.
  • What keywords are driving traffic to your site.
  • What pages are receiving the highest click-through-rate from Google’s search results.
  • Who is linking to your site.
  • How well your site is being read by Google’s spiders/bots.
  • Where pages are causing errors for your users.

Don’t delay – get started with your Webmaster Academy training today!


Schema.org Actions – Latest Update in Schema Markup

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014

What is Schema.org Markup

Simply put, these HTML tags (Schemas) allow webmaster to markup different sections of their websites which are better recognised by major search engines. Some of the more familiar ones would be reviews, product and organisation.

Schema Actions

What are Schema.org Actions

Schema.org has expanded its structured data to give websites the opportunity to describe the actions they enable and how these actions can be invoked: Schema.org Actions. The new markup allows us to dictate how your action can be connected. The guys over on Seroundtable received the following answer from Bing on what it means:

The Action vocabulary is intended to be used primarily for describing actions that have taken place in the past [past actions] or could take place in the future [potential actions]. Let’s assume Barry shared an MSN article on Facebook yesterday. This is an example of a past action. Facebook might use schema.org to describe the action by indicating that Jason is the subject (agent) of the action, the action verb is sharing, and the object of the action is an MSN article. Now let’s say MSN wanted to expose the ability for applications to programmatically share an article on their website. This would be an example of a potential action. MSN might use schema.org to describe the potential action by indicating the action verb is ‘sharing’ and that you can perform this action by calling a specific URL

It was also summarised nicely in the comments section:

It’s a schema to add context to a link or block of content. It is a way of annotating content to cite sources and authors and the type of activity that happened between the two… i.e. Joe shared Susan’s post. Linda retweeted Billy’s Tweet. Simon liked Fred’s Photo… with URLs and dates and all the metadata to go along with it.

Schema.org Actions Available

actionStatus: Indicates the current disposition of the Action.
agent: The direct performer or driver of the action (animate or inanimate). e.g. *John* wrote a book.
endTime: When the Action was performed: end time. This is for actions that span a period of time. e.g. John wrote a book from January to *December*.
instrument: The object that helped the agent perform the action. e.g. John wrote a book with *a pen*.
location: The location of the event, organization or action.
object: The object upon the action is carried out, whose state is kept intact or changed. Also known as the semantic roles patient, affected or undergoer (which change their state) or theme (which doesn’t). e.g. John read *a book*.
participant: Other co-agents that participated in the action indirectly. e.g. John wrote a book with *Steve*.
result: The result produced in the action. e.g. John wrote *a book*.
startTime: When the Action was performed: start time. This is for actions that span a period of time. e.g. John wrote a book from *January* to December.
target: Indicates a target EntryPoint for an Action.

At Reprise we have always worked towards implementing such Schema markup and it seems the focus on semantics by Google has increased drastically since hummingbird. Google are regularly updating guidelines and working with the likes of schema.org to improve this process as is evident by a recent Google Webmaster Tools post on helping Google identify your business’s contact and local info.

Schema.org Markup Searchmetrics Study

With this in mind Search Metrics released a US case study on surrounding schema adoption and the affect it has on performance. (likely similar impact in the Australian Index).

Some key takeaways from the study are below. We believe the last point will influence companies to the point of implementation along with the benefits seen in CTRs through Rich Snippets which schema can also provide.

• Only 0.3% of the studied domains were found to include schema.org integrations.
• For only 34.4% of keywords examined, Google returned search results with neither schema.org integrations nor any other structured data involved.
• The share of websites with schema.org integrations is highest in Germany (compared to US, UK, FR and ES).
• The most common integrations are “Movies“, “Offers“ and “TV series“.
• Review and ratings integrations from schema.org are over 60% positive.
• Pages with schema.org integrations rank better by an average of four positions compared to pages without schema.org integrations.

You can read the full study at here.